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Lesson Adaptations

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Homeroom Community Forum Completed Lessons (NEW!) Lesson Adaptations

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
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  • #6388
    Erin Loechner
    Keymaster

    Did you put your own unique spin on your lesson this week? We want to hear all about it!

    #7405
    anonymous
    Participant

    Today we altered the tree archery by throwing rocks into a small puddle. This led to 90ish minutes of deeply focused play for my 2 year old, he rarely focuses for longer than 10 minutes on anything! He made rock piles in the puddles and asked to go on a stick hunt. We found the perfect stick to make rock soup and drum. Then he pretended to be Giant Alex from Paw Patrol, yelling Fee Fi Fo Fum while stomping around the yard. The only prompting I did was asking him to aim rocks at a puddle and I guarded the perimetre, no fence and we’re beside a street. Great morning!

    #7640
    Erin Loechner
    Keymaster

    SO SO SO SO SO GOOD, Mel! We’re cheering you on!!!!!! Love your approach to allowing so much deep focus for him :)

    #7825
    Jeanine Federline
    Participant

    I’m loving the idea of working on this week’s seed bombing lesson with my three-year-old. There’s nothing she loves more than mixing things up together and getting messy! This one will be a total win! I’m wondering: how long will the dried bombs last? I’m inspired to let her go hog-wild and create bombs for our family and friends to package up as holiday gifts.

    #7918
    Erin Loechner
    Keymaster

    I’m so glad you’ll be seed bombing with your 3-year-old — I’ve got a lover-of-mix-and-messes over here, too, and it was a total hit! You can store your dried seed bombs for up to six months in a sealed container. I’d just be sure they’re fully dry before you store them. :)

    What a LOVELY idea to gift them for the holidays! Enjoy!

    xo,
    e.

    #8841
    anonymous
    Participant

    Sam loved collecting and cutting leaves but our art turned into drawing THROUGH the leaves and then leaf rubbing – LOL! (Leaf rubbing is a great alternative to drawing the symmetrical side of the leaf. You can put the cut side under the paper in line with the not cut side and make the leaf whole again by rubbing!) We also learned that sedum leaves are gooey inside and if you stick an eraser in one you’ll smear green all over the paper wherever you use the eraser! 😃

    #9267
    anonymous
    Participant

    Ok so Sir Mix-a-Face was fun, but when my 8yo chimed in, it went beyond fun. They started making wide faces, extra long faces, mixed up faces! But a fun adaptation was when I blindfolded them, had them choose facial features (without peeking!), and then arrange their faces before removing the blindfold. Upside down eyes and noses on chins, we took the fun of this activity to the next level!

    #9303
    Erin Loechner
    Keymaster

    JENN! I am loving these genius adaptations! Thank you so much for sharing!!!

    #9389
    anonymous
    Participant

    Aww <3 we’re loving them too!

    #9481
    anonymous
    Participant

    Ok so instead of a rock sculpture this week, we stumbled upon an apple tree and were marvelling at all the apples on the ground! We found dozens that weren’t mushy (to avoid the bees!) and challenged each other to build towers with apples. Now let me tell you – this is no easy feat!!! But super fun 😊

    #9547
    anonymous
    Participant

    Hey all! So I’ve been doing the poems and such for the weekly breakfast reading, and just couldn’t get my 3yo to take hold. Which surprised me because he LOVES stories (omg I could recite 5 or 6 different Dr Seuss books front to back, we’ve read them so often. Actually, he can too! lol) and he LOVES songs. His memory for language-based things is incredible. So I asked him if he wanted to come up with some actions for the fall poem and he was on board! We co-created very simple actions to go along with the poem and he can now “sing” the entire thing. I’ll post a video in my IG stories for anyone needing some “actions” ideas – we do this with most of the songs we sing at the forest school I supply teach at and it’s amazing to see how quickly kids get into a song/poem when their bodies can get involved too! @blended_fam.3_girls_and_sam PS – I’m not sure if I’m allowed to share my instagram on here, Erin? I read through the Forum Policies and don’t think my IG account counts as a link to another website but if it does, pleas feel free to delete it!

    #9631
    Erin Loechner
    Keymaster

    LOVE THIS, JENN! And you can 10000% share your IG link here — we treasure community online and off around here. Thank you for such fantastic suggestions!!!!! ;)

    #10003
    anonymous
    Participant

    My 3 year old was excited to play wishing well, but after a while she wanted to all the floating things to sink to the bottom, too. We stuck modeling clay (which is pretty water proof) onto the legos and playmobil pieces she had chosen to put in the bowl of water and kept adding more until it was enough to sink them. I’m sure there is a lot more you could do with modeling clay and water (make boats?) but this was a fun addition to the wishing well, for us.

    #10073
    Erin Loechner
    Keymaster

    So so good, Anna – thank you for sharing such a great adaptation! Love how you went with the flow (literally?????)! :)

    #39988
    anonymous
    Participant

    When doing the yarn tangle maze, my 3.5 year old was more concerned with untying the initial knot, so I tied a few short strands in loose double knots on the back of our dining chairs for her to untie – she loved that!

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